Category Archives: Learn About Wine

Melissa’s Winter Wine Picks

“This winter I want to share with you the wines that I grab when I am looking for comfort. Like the crackers you still buy when you don’t feel great. The crackers your grandmother fed you when you stayed home from school in January, that immediately made you feel better. Each of the wines are from vineyards I know well, having visited nearly all. Several of them I’ve brought into Rhode Island for the first time, and are available exclusively at Bottles. Each has left a mark on me, and I think lots of them will do the same for you. I encourage you find me to learn more about each, and to let me know what you think!” -Melissa Principe, Wine Director

Dei Rosso di Montepulciano, Italy
Dei is one of the very first vineyards I spent time at in Italy. The owners were just in the process of plotting the land for their new tasting room and winery expansion. It was not a huge winery and I can still smell the cellar where they age their wines. They produce one of the best olive oils I have ever had in my life (unfortunately, they don’t sell it outside of the vineyard). This wine is dirt and roses all at the same time. Amazing. $19.99

Villa Giada “Suri” Moscato d’Asti, Italy
I introduced you to this winery and wine last week, though because I love it so much, I’m including it here. It’s made by my friend Andrea Faccio, who owns Villa Giada. His mom happens to make amazing biscotti, and though we can’t get them here, I suggest dunking any well-made version into this wine for an authentic Italian experience. On sale through February 11, 2018: $12.99 (compare to $16.99)

Tikal “Natural” Malbec, Uco Valley, Argentina
I picked this wine because not only is it outstandingly-well made and easy to drink, but because I think a lot of us try to be healthier in the winter – at least the first few resolution-filled months of it. Tikal is hand-harvested and biodynamic. It’s made from 60% organic Malbec, 40% organic Syrah, 100% of which will change your life for the better. I met winemaker Alejandro Kuschnaroff when I visited Tikal in April 2017 – and I’m not the first nor the last to report that this talented man bears a striking resemblance to our most common representations of Jesus. Which may or may not have any bearing on your decision to buy this wine, but there it is. $23.99

Barros Ports, White, Tawny & Ruby, Douro Valley, Portugal
One of the 2018 goals of the Bottles Wine Department is to get more of you turned on to good Port. If you’ve never experienced one, you’re starving yourself and you don’t even know it. The Ports made by Barros are my favorites, and at this excellent price, you can afford to purchase without ever having tasted one before. Grab any Bottles staff member for a quick primer on these different styles, how to store, serve and enjoy. And stay tuned for upcoming Port tastings in store. $13.99 each

White Knight Prosecco, Veneto, Italy
My pick for winter bubbles is this stunner. It’s perfectly crisp and light, with a creamy mouthfeel, and balanced acidity. The bubbles are soft with an aromatic nose of apple and pineapple. I serve it to start all of my cold-weather dinner parties. Also, because it’s so light, I serve it to myself after a long day of studying. I could make some White Knight puns here, but I’ll spare you. Just buy it and enjoy. $14.99

Mayu Carmenere & Syrah Blend, Elqui Valley, Chile  
I was recently asked what my favorite pairing is. This is the wine, and I love it paired with … drumroll please … The Chicago Blend. For those of you not from Chi-Town, the blend is a mix of caramel corn and cheese popcorn. And the wine is a blend of 55% Carmenere and 45% Syrah – two big grapes that can stand up to all that flavor. The pairing is ridiculous. It’s totally goofy and it totally works. Particularly with all of the binge watching we’re all doing to escape the cold. (PS – you all told me winters here wouldn’t be as bad as they are in Chicago. Thanks for nothing.) $14.99

Mayu Pedro Ximenez, Elqui Valley, Chile
Wait..what? A still Pedro Ximenez??? Isn’t that the grape that’s usually used in sparkling Cava! Yes, yes it is, you smart thing you. And it is yummy and delightful and perfect and you should drink it. It has beautiful fruit and floral flavors, all evened out with good minerals and acidity. Branch out and try something new in 2018. Then be sure to find me and let me know what you think – I’d really love to know! $14.99

Dry Creek Heritage Zinfandel, Sonoma County, California
I love Dry Creek Vineyard! It was one of the first vineyards to go completely 100% sustainable! Oh…and the wines are stunning. I could drink their Chenin Blanc all day. But, we are talking Zinfandel here, and their Zin has some serious chops. It has a stunning depth and richness, with a long finish on the palate. There’s a pepper spice to it, too, that is not the norm in California Zinfandel, so if you’ve been a skeptic before, try this one. Scrumptious. $19.99

I truly do hope that you’ll give a few of my go-to wines a try and will let me know what you think of them. Enjoy!

prices subject to change

###

The Spectacular Wines of Villa Giada

Villa Giada

We’re so excited to introduce you to the very special Villa Giada wines, which Melissa had imported into Rhode Island just for us. She visited the winery, in the northern Italian region of Piedmont, in the summer of 2017, where she spent time with winemaker and owner Andrea Faccio. To celebrate their arrival, we’ve put them on sale through February 11, 2018.

Says Melissa:

“I learned more about wine in four hours in the vineyard and cellars of Villa Giada with Andrea than I have in the past four years of my intensive wine study.  All of the Villa Giada wines are produced in small quantities, hand-harvested, and sustainable. Just five days before harvest we bounced around in his 1972 Jeep driving through the vineyards and tasting Moscato grapes. (Thankfully, there was a “hold on for dear life” handle in that Jeep.) We then spent time in his cellar, where, walking and at times crawling, I had the most meaningful lesson about WW2: Still in place was a false wall they had built to protect their wines, their history, their lineage and their way of life from the Germans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Andrea’s 1972 Jeep

The cellar at Villa Giada

“All of Andrea’s wines are special. One of their most critically-acclaimed is the Moscato d’Asti. And truth be told, I was never really a huge fan of Moscato – it was to me just the wine my mother drinks by the bucket with ice cubes. But Andrea’s Moscato has a subtle nuance and complexity that only become more prominent once its opened. All of his wines have similar layers of interesting and alluring complexity and flavor. They really are something.”

Moscato grapes at Villa Giada

Here are the wines that Melissa brought into Rhode Island. We do hope that you’ll give them a try and will let us know what you think:

Suri Moscato d’Asti

Moscato is sweet, there’s no question about it. But the sweet in Andrea’s Moscato is like honeysuckle, not like white sugar. There is a huge difference. There’s a lightness and floral tones in the Suri’s sweetness, compared to the bracing, make-your-teeth-hurt sweetness in other Moscatos on the market today. On sale: $12.99 (regularly $16.99)

Suri Barbera d’Asti

Barbera can be really acidic depending on where it is planted. This Barbera is far more floral and has a softer mouthfeel than most at this price point. Think lavender and cocoa with a soft berry finish. On sale: $12.99 (regularly $16.99)

San Pietro Dolcetto
Oh yes please. As a grape, Dolcetto is taken for granted. Everyone kinda knows it, but really, they don’t.  This is the wine for the California Pinot Noir drinker who is looking for something different. It has spicy structured tannins, and underlying bright red berry fruit, and it finishes with happy. On sale: $12.99 (regularly $16.99)

Tre Ponti Monferrato, Nebbiolo

Unlike lots of Nebbiolos that need years of aging to be enjoyed, this bottle is ready for you tonight. Once you open it, give it some time to breath, and it will show you what it is all about. It has so many layers – it’s very complex. It lures you into letting it stay for awhile, it begs you not to finish the bottle right away. If you have patience, and are able to hold off on finishing it in one day (I can’t), you’ll enjoy its evolution for days. On sale: $19.99 (regularly $24.99)

Salut!

***prices subject to change

Great Wines – That Just Happen To Be Kosher!

Let’s face it. The star of the Hanukkah table isn’t typically the wine, but rather the amazing food served at the traditional Festival of Lights dinner. The brisket, the kugel, the salmon. The latkes, the apple donuts.

That said, there’s no reason – none, zilch – why wine should take a back seat to those festive foods. When chosen carefully, a good wine will make your Hanukkah celebration shine even brighter. Here’s our selection of the wines that will do just that. They’re all terrific, and they all just happen to be kosher.

Unorthodox Merlot/ Cabernet Sauvignon Blend
South Africa
$14.99 
This beautiful wine is a brilliant ruby red, and finishes with delightful, soft tannins. It has nice dried-fruit and herb aromas, and flavors of darker unripe cherries that make it a perfect pairing with your brisket.

Unorthodox Sauvignon Blanc
South Africa
$14.99
Forget the big, unbalanced grassy nose that has become so common in inferior Sauvignon Blancs, and instead delight in the bright tropical fruit flavors found in this bottle. We’re thinking salmon and latkes for sure.

La Citadelle De Diamant “Caesar” Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot/Shiraz Blend
Israel
$29.99
This one had us at Shalom. It’s big, with wonderful spice: think classic Bordeaux with a splash of Shiraz to shake things up. It has kugel and brisket and best-hostess-gift-ever written all over it.

Chag Sameach from your Bottles Family!

*prices subject to change

The Stunning Kelley Fox Wines

One of the first things that Bottles’ new Wine Director Melissa Principe did when she got to the store was ensure that we received an allocation of Kelley Fox wines. The Oregon Pinot Noirs have achieved a cult status over the past few years due to their high-quality and limited production; they’re among the most sought-after wines in the country.

“Anyone who avers that New World Pinot cannot match Burgundy for finesse and complexity has clearly never tried anything from this small, impressively consistent producer. Kelley Fox cut her winemaking teeth at Eyrie (and that influence shows very clearly in the wines she produces under her own name), followed by a 10-year stint (2005 to 2015) as winemaker at Scott Paul. She launched her own winery in 2007 and now produces around 2,000 cases a year of lithe, mineral-driven and strikingly pure Pinots from two of the Willamette Valley’s most highly regarded and meticulously farmed vineyards, Maresh and Momtazi. Native yeasts are used for all of the wines, and anywhere from a third to three-quarters whole clusters have been used since the beginning, but as of the 2015 vintage Fox will be using all whole bunches. She started out by using about one-third new oak for her first three vintages, used a bit for 2010 and 2011 and now uses none at all because she wants her wines ‘to be as pure and unadorned as possible, and oak can get in the way.’ As approachable as Fox’s wines are soon after release, they have the balance to age and, as a bonus, they deliver exceptional value for their quality.”

That’s what Josh Raynolds said in Vinous, and we couldn’t agree more.

Here are Melissa’s notes on the stunning wines of Kelley Fox:

2015 Ahurani Pinot Noir, Demeter Certified Biodynamic

This is a big wine! It has lots of acid and fresh cherry fruit, big iron and a good cherry nose, which is trademark Oregon. Only 607 cases produced.

$43.99

 

 

 

 

2015 Mirabai Pinot Noir

The Mirabai is made from 47-year-old vines and crushed with whole cluster fruit. It opens with a nose of sun-warmed strawberries and a little spice, and finishes with a strong tannin structure and acidity that welcomes fatty dishes. Think duck! Only 495 cases produced.

$43.99

 

 

 

2015 Momtazi Vineyard Pinot Noir, Demeter Certified Biodynamic

The grapes for this bottle were harvested from three specific sites on the famed Momtazi vineyard; they’re all from Burgundian clones, are hand harvested, and whole cluster pressed. It has aromas of fresh black cherries and ripe black berry fruit, and finishes with balanced minerality and fleshy acid. Only 410 cases produced.

$57.99

 

 

2015 Maresh Vineyard Pinot Noir

The Maresh has a classic silk texture that can only be Oregon. The nose is full of violet and petite rose petals; ripe cherry and dark berry fruit glide on the finish. This wine is made to age. Only 192 cases produced.

$75.99

 

 

 

We hope you’re able to take advantage of these stunning wines this holiday season.

Cheers!

prices subject to change

###

Why the Pros Buy Magnums for Holiday Entertaining


Planning a holiday party for more than just a few guests? Do what the pros do, and buy magnums. It’ll save you dough, and the larger size can add drama to your festivities.

A magnum of wine is 1.5 liters, which equates to two standard bottles’ worth of juice. And in most instances, one magnum costs less than if you purchased the two-bottles separately.

Magnums of Bottles’ house wine, Vino di Tavola, are particularly ideal for large gatherings: they’re well made, crowd-pleasers, very food-friendly and highly-drinkable. How do we know? They’re top-sellers here in store, and at our sister bar, The East End.

Both are made in Italy, in the small Piedmontese commune of Castellinaldo. Our Vino di Tavola Rosso is a blend of barbera and dolcetto, the Bianco is a mix of the arneis and favorita grapes.

And while pouring from larger-than-normal bottles can certainly add excitement to your festivities, there are a few folks who find the heavier bottles a bit unwieldy. For them, we suggest simply decanting the magnums into carafes ahead of time, for an easier at-table pour. 

This holiday season we’re offering special pricing on case purchases of our house wine magnums. Regularly $79, we’re offering the 6-magnum case for just $75, and will include a free engraved Bormioli glass carafe.* 

Now if you follow our party math, six magnums will be enough to serve wine all evening for a dinner party of 12. All for just $75. 

That’s something to toast to!

Happy Holidays – and Happy Entertaining!

*while supplies last. additional discounts do not apply. prices subject to change.  
###

Top Thanksgiving Wines, Part II

Last week we shared the sparkling and white wines that we’ll be drinking come November 23, 2017. This week we present our picks for the rosé and reds that we think will that will complement your feast. Without further ado:

Charles Bieler Rosé, Provence
After we’ve taken a break from rosé during September and October, it’s nice to revisit a great one for Thanksgiving as a reminder that the pink phenomenon is good all year round. With light berry notes and a zippy acidity, this food-friendly wine will really make your entire feast sing!
$12.99

Primarius Pinot Noir, Oregon
This beauty from the Pacific Northwest has everything we look for in a Pinot Noir. Light in body, but with the depth of flavor and nuance that Oregon is famous for. This is one of our favorite ‘every day’ Pinots, but it really shines at the Thanksgiving table.
$16.99

Nicolas Chamarin “P’tit Grobis,” France
Don’t be fooled by this ‘Little Bear’ from Beaujolais! It’s an under-appreciated wine that carries great depth and weight, but with an extremely light body. It finishes with a wisp of baking spice, clove, and cola that’s an ideal partner for our traditional Thanksgiving spices. We’ll be bringing this one home to share, for sure.
$17.99

Billard Cotes-de-Beaune, France
An elegant wine for an elegant table, this little gem comes from a very small French producer who carefully tends just a few acres of Pinot Noir before pressing them by foot. Aged for 10 months in oak, this nicely-structured Pinot comes to life at the dinner table, and always helps the conversation flow.
$21.99

Wishing you and yours a very happy Thanksgiving!

# # #

(prices subject to change)

Top Thanksgiving Wines, Part I

November is our favorite time of the year at Bottles, which is why our team spends a good bit of the year thinking about you, your Thanksgiving dinner, and the bottles that will make your dinner sing. Out of the thousands of wines we taste each year, our nine November selections must meet the following criteria:

a) they must taste good
b) they must be agile enough to complement the Thanksgiving dinner as enjoyed on the whole
c) they must represent a good value
d) they must taste good.

Did we mention they must taste good?

Here are the sparkling and white wines that we’ll be drinking this November 23. Stay tuned next week for our rosé and red wine choices.

Terre di Marca Prosecco, Italy
Our favorite Prosecco for the second year running. It’s dry and full of expressive bubbles, it’s organic, and it comes in a cool looking bottle. What better way to toast to your guests’ health?
$13.99

Gérard Bertrand Crémant, France
A velvety soft and creamy French sparkler that’s less acidic and bracing than a true Champagne at twice the price, meaning you can sip on it through the entire Thanksgiving meal. This is the bottle (or two, or three) to have on hand for special company.
$19.99

Pere Mata Cava, Spain
The great thing about Cavas is that they’re bone-dry, elegant, and wallet-friendly. The Pere Mata in particular has terrific citrus and floral notes that will complement everything from that rich turkey and gravy to your after-dinner slice of pie.
$17.99

Dry Creek Chenin Blanc, California
Here’s the perfect choice for an all-purpose Thanksgiving white, satisfying both your aunt who loves Sauvignon Blanc and your cousin Marie who only drinks Chardonnay. It’s dry, crisp, and refreshing with a subtle baked apple and vanilla quality. Yes, please.
$12.99

Michel Caillot “Les Herbeux,” France
Ah, Mersault! From the heart of France, this rich and creamy, understated yet persistent, incredibly floral and expressive Chardonnay will knock your socks off. Mersault is the Chardonnay that even non-Chardonnay drinkers love. It’s. That. Good. Treat yourself!
$34.99

Happy Thanksgiving!

(prices subject to change)

###

Meet Melissa – Bottles’ New Wine Director!

We’re so happy to introduce you to our new Wine Director, Melissa Principe. She’s a native Chicagoan who recently relocated to Rhode Island to give life on the East Coast a try. Prior to making the road trip to Providence with her co-pilot Piccolo (a two-year-old mini black lab), Melissa was in charge of the wine, beer and spirits programs for a popular speciality market chain of stores all throughout Illinois. She has scads of hospitality experience, having served as general manager and sommelier at various restaurants in Chicagoland, and was the Wine Director for the award-winning Tasting Room/Randolph Wine Cellars. Melissa has seven (seven!) older brothers, loves Sicilian and South American wines, is studying for her Masters of Wine, and is a killer bocce player. Though she’s incredibly busy adjusting to life in Rhode Island and getting to know the Bottles family of customers, Melissa took a few minutes to tell us a bit about herself.

Why wine. What sparked your interest in wine?
I grew up with it. My mother is Sicilian and my father is from Calabria. So there was always wine on the table. I’ve been down many other paths in my professional life, but wine is one of few things that’s kept my interest all along.

What are you most excited about in the wine world today?
I really like the fact that there are younger winemakers that are going back to the “old school” way of making wine. I’ve been lucky to travel a lot, and what I’m seeing is that there are more and more winemakers who are concerned about making sure that they’re taking care of their sense of place in terms of sustainability, organic practices, and biodynamics. I am obsessed with biodynamics, and a bit of a soil nerd. These things are so important to wine. Look back at the past two years. There hasn’t been one wine-making region that hasn’t been majorly affected by the super hot summers and changing weather patterns. It’s smacking you in the face! So there’s more consciousness around how we’re treating our land and our vineyards. This is good.

What’s underappreciated in the wine world today?
Port and other fortified wines. I don’t fully understand it, but turning women on to Port is a huge challenge! Maybe because there’s still the stereotype that Port is a stuffy Englishman’s drink to be sipped while smoking cigars. We all should totally be drinking more of it. Fortified wines in general get overlooked – and they shouldn’t. They are lovely.

How have you found success within the world of wine?
Through education and storytelling. I love to teach, and I’m a stickler for education. I have huge expectations for my staff. I’ll be there to help them reach those expectations every step of the way, so that we’re all able to serve our customers in the best possible way. I view our roles as storytellers – and that’s really important to me. Before a customer buys a bottle, we’re the last professional that has hands on it. That’s a pretty serious job to me. We better know all about that wine. We better know that winemaker’s story. Also, I like to be on the floor. I really like to talk about wine, to get people excited about wine. I like to engage guests – to ask lots of questions so I can fully understand what they’re looking for.

Though you’ve only been at Bottles for a few weeks, do you have any plans for the wine program that you can share?
I like sustainability – I’m nuts about biodynamic wines. So you may see more of those. Along with Sicilian and South American wines. And fortified wines. Things like this and more, which will balance all that Josh (Bottles’ General Manager) has brought in. Our palates are very different – he’s all about France, which is so great for us – and I can’t pick just one region. We’re a great match – it’s a great balance between the two of us – and the shelves will be reflective of that.

What’s Your “Desert Island” Wine?
The wine that changed everything for me was the 1987 Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino Riserva White Label. Everything about it was amazing. Everyone who’s into wine has a bottle they chase – this is that bottle for me. I’ll also never forget the Barros ‘82 Colheita, which I hope to bringing into the store soon. And lastly, the Andre Clouet Brut Reserve Rosé. You want to bathe in it.

Why Providence?
I still love Chicago but I was ready for a change. In addition to a milder winter (!) I’m looking forward doing business in this smaller market. Rhode Island hasn’t been taken over by big business quite yet. Coming from a big city I saw the impact that letting the big guys take over had on selection and service. It’s so depressing to taste an amazing bottle of wine in rural Italy and know that it wouldn’t stand a chance in getting into a market dominated by chains. It’s stores like Bottles that give me hope in the face of the big guys.

What will you miss most about Chicago?
Sunday dinner with my brother and sister-in-law.

When you’re not working, what are you doing?
Hanging out with my dog Piccolo, cooking, or studying. I’m in the middle of my Master’s of Wine program.

What’s your favorite wine pairing?
Mayu and The Chicago Blend. Mayu is a Chilean producer and has a red blend of carmenere & syrah. The Chicago blend is a mix of caramel corn and cheese popcorn. It’s ridiculous. It’s totally goofy and it totally works.

If you could have a dinner party with any three people in the world, who would they be?
One, the wine writer Jancis Robinson. I love her writing, the way she thinks and talks about wine. She was the first female Master of Wine and was at the 1976 Judgement of Paris, and I’d love to pick her brain on a thousand different things. Another would be Ruth Bader Ginsburg: I’d want to know what her desert island wine is, among other things, of course. And the third would be my amazing niece Francesca with whom I’m incredibly close, because these are two women she should have the experience of sitting down and having dinner with.

Next time you’re in store, be sure to look for Melissa and say hello. And stay tuned for more from her in the weeks to come!

# # #

Wine For “Steakhouse Night,” At Home

When we opened the current issue of Edible Rhody and saw New Rivers Chef Beau Vestal’s very delicious take on the traditional “steakhouse” dinner, our minds immediately went to the classic “steakhouse” pairing: a big ‘ole bottle of hearty red wine.

It’s an enduring, no-fail pairing that’s enjoyed nightly in steakhouses across the county. And given Chef Beau’s simple recipe for all the fixins, there’s no reason you can’t replicate it at home. Says Chef Beau:  “A quick herb rub and a short time on the grill makes hanger steak, one of the most flavorful cuts of beef, really sing. Serve the steaks with roasted spiced sweet potatoes and lightly creamed kale and any autumn night can be steakhouse night!

And for our wine pairing we turned to our brand new Wine Director Melissa Principe, whom you’ll be hearing a lot from in the coming weeks. We’re excited to have her with us and can’t wait for you to meet her.

Melissa paired the steak, sweet potato & creamed spinach with the 2016 La Posta Pizzella Malbec ($17.99): “I have had the pleasure of visiting this vineyard and meeting the Pizzella family. Argentina has a deep history of Italian immigrants and the La Posta project highlights those connections with these single vineyard wines. Chef Beau’s recipe reminded me of the amazing lunch we had at the vineyard that highlighted the natural pairing of beef and malbec. The Pizzella is full and lush, and hits you at first with a nose of dark berry fruit and cocoa, then unfolds with a beautiful pink peppercorn spice on the finish. The longer it’s open, the deeper the cocoa gets, and the richer the berry flavor. It’s a big wine for a big steak dinner!”


Chef Beau Vestal’s Grilled Hanger Steak and Sweet Potato “Steak Fries” with Pumpkin Seek Chimichurri and Lightly Creamed Kale

INGREDIENTS

Chimichurri:
½ cup fresh parsley, coarsely chopped
¼ cup fresh oregano, coarsely chopped
4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
3 tablespoons pumpkin seeds (or pepitas), shelled and toasted
½ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Sweet Potatoes:
3 large sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds), washed and cut into ½-inch-thick wedges
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon ground allspice
½ teaspoon ground fennel seed
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper

Steak:
¼ cup fresh rosemary leaves
¼ cup fresh sage leaves
4 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon cracked pepper
1 teaspoon kosher salt
6 (6 ounce) pieces hanger steak

METHOD

First make the chimichurri: Combine parsley, oregano, vinegar, garlic, red pepper flakes, salt and black pepper in a food processor and blend until smooth. Transfer to a bowl and add pumpkin seeds and olive oil. Stir to combine. Check seasoning and set aside.

Preheat oven to 400°F. In a large bowl, toss together the sweet potatoes, olive oil, allspice, fennel, salt and pepper. Arrange slices in single layer on a lined baking sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes. Rotate pan and flip sweet potatoes over to ensure even browning. Bake additional 10 minutes until potatoes are “fork-tender” and nicely browned.

For the steaks, add fresh herbs, olive oil, salt and pepper in a blender and purée until smooth. Rub all over steaks until steaks are well-coated. Let them sit while you heat up the grill (or use a grill pan over high heat).

Grill steaks over high heat about 3 to 4 minutes per side. (A meat thermometer should read 130ºF for medium-rare to medium.) Pull steaks off grill and place on plate tented with foil to keep warm until ready to serve. Drizzle steak with chimichurri and serve alongside sweet potatoes and the creamed kale. Serves 6.

Enjoy!

# # #

Top Wines For Fall – Part II

Last week we introduced you to four of the wines that our team’s been reaching for now that the mercury is dipping into the 50s. Here are a few more that we recommend. Give them a try – we think you’ll love them as much as we do.

Ravines Cabernet Franc, Finger Lakes, NY
An adult wine from the Finger Lakes with lots to offer, and just a little chip on its shoulder about how much attention New York City gets compared to the Finger Lakes. Kinda like Providence. Flavors of dusty berries, baking spice & black pepper mean this wine loves pork, red meat & game, with creamy potatoes & wilted greens on the side. You’re welcome.
$19.99

B.R. Cohn Silver Label Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma/Napa, CA
This is the bruiser of our Fall Wine Picks: it’s a big, straightforward cabernet sucker-punch to the mouth, tailor made for easy-drinking on cool New England fall nights. Preferably with hearty food with some fat. Maybe like a grilled sirloin or lamb chops, you ask? Yeah, that’d be nice.
$24.99

Domaine Maby Rosé, Tavel, France
You know what we say here at Bottles – anytime is a good time for rosé! In the fall, we trade in our whisper-light versions for those with more heft to stand up to a morning frost on the pumpkin. Tavel wines have that weight, along with sultry floral aromas that make it a great dance partner with the roasted chicken, pork or veggies you’ve been craving.
$19.99

Yves Cuilleron Marsanne, Rhone, France
There are few whites that are as food friendly as the under-appreciated marsanne, what with its rich wildflower honey & hazelnut flavors that beg for the grilled and roasty foods of the fall. If you break this one out at your next dinner party, & serve a simple roast chicken, you’ll prove to your pals that you know your wine!
$24.99

Sultana Grillo, Sicily, Italy
If this is “just a simple Sicilian table wine,” then why the heck to we like it so much? Because it’s got bright citrus, peach & almond flavors in spades, is easy drinking and pairs well with virtually everything, especially herb-y, cheesy dishes. We’re crowning it the the ultimate dinner party wine this season. Go forth and drink.
$11.99

Happy Fall!

###