Tag Archives: Rosé

Rosé Popsicles!

It’s mid-August and summer is nearly over (don’t shoot the messenger). We might be sick of tomato sandwiches, sick of already seeing Halloween decorations and sick of seeing school supplies (why does that still make me anxious when I’m not even a student or a teacher?!) One thing that we are definitely not sick of, however, is rosè. It’s been the star of the summer and for these last couple weeks of sweltering August heat, we recommend serving it up all icy and on a stick, or in a good ‘ole push-up bag.

Below is a recipe for our rosè popsicles. Since the batch we make yields a large amount, we should tell you to serve them at your next BBQ or picnic, but there is no reason you couldn’t scale this down and whip up a batch to keep in your freezer for any night of the week. You deserve it.

PS. Any leftover unfrozen rosè juice makes a delicious drink to sip over ice!

Alex’s Famous Rosè Popsicles

Ingredients

One 750ml bottle rosè of your choice (we recommend something dry but with a good boost of fruitiness. Ask a Bottles team member and they’ll steer you in the right direction.)

One 750ml bottle sparkling water

8 oz. simple syrup

16 oz. fruit juice (we recommend watermelon, berry or grapefruit. Take a sip of your rosè and see what flavors you think would match best.)

Tools

Mold of choice (we’ve used things from loaf pans to muffin tins to plastic cups to inexpensive plastic bags easily found on Amazon.)

Popsicle sticks, if using

Instructions

Combine all ingredients and stir vigorously. Pour your concoction into your desired molds, freeze for at least12 hours (it’ll be worth it). If you’re using the push-up bags, be sure to leave an inch or more at the top, as the popsicle will expand as it freezes.

Serve ’em up and enjoy those last licks of summer.

xoxo Alex

Which Rosé is Right For You?

It’s midsummer and the wine world is swimming in a sea of rosé. Let our life-raft of a chart help you pick the one that’s right for you and your palate.

Do you solely drink light whites? Stick with those in the lower left quadrant. Like reds and wines with savory notes? Make the bottles in the upper right your new BFFs.

Enjoy!

Prices subject to change

A Wine to Pair with Roasted Pork Loin, Summer Vegetables & Herbs

If you haven’t yet spent time with the summer issue of Edible Rhody, you’re missing out on coverage of some of the best seasonal eating and drinking our state has to offer. To tide you over until you do pick up a complimentary copy at Bottles, we’re happy to present a pairing of a terrific wine with a summer-style roasted pork loin dish from Metacom Kitchen’s Chef/Owner Richard Allaire.

pork

Said Chef Richard: “This recipe embraces the simplicity of summer cooking when you can let the ingredients shine through. You can adapt this using other vegetables, citrus or herbs depending on what is available at the farmers’ market.”

chinonKate Miceli, our Wine Assistant, paired this seasonal dish with the 2016 Couly-Dutheil Chinon Rosé. Said Kate: “Made from 100% cabernet franc, the Couly-Dutheil is punchy with pronounced flavors of ripe plums, mulberries, fresh thyme and lilac flowers. It has a luscious mouthfeel that is perfect with roasted pork, and the herbaceous tones mingle fantastically with the herbs and the carrot cumin sauce. Enjoy!”

 

 

 

Roasted Pork Loin, Grilled Corn, Pearl Couscous Salad with Warm Carrot Cumin Sauce.(Serves 4)

INGREDIENTS

1 pound pork tenderloin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
Kosher salt
Extra-virgin olive oil
4 ears fresh sweet corn, shucked
3 large carrots, peeled and sliced
3 shallots, minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin seed
1 lime
25 snow peas (or use snap peas or green beans), blanched
4 ounces Israeli couscous
1 large heirloom tomato, seeded and diced
1⁄4 cup fresh cilantro leaves

METHOD

Preheat oven to 300°F. Preheat grill or prepare coals. Season pork with coriander and salt, then rub with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Place on grill and sear on all sides (this should take just a few minutes), then transfer to a cooking rack set over a rimmed baking sheet. Place in the oven for approximately 35 to 45 minutes. Using a thermometer, remove from oven when internal temperature is 140°F. Set aside and let rest at room temperature while you prepare the salad.

Meanwhile, coat corn with 1 tablespoon olive oil and char on the grill on all sides. Let the cobs cool, then cut corn kernels off of the cob. Reserve the kernels and place the shorn cobs in a pot with the carrots, minced shallots and ground cumin seed. Add 2 cups water. Bring to a simmer and cook until carrots are very tender, approximately 15 minutes. Remove from heat and discard corn cobs. Transfer carrots, shallots and liquid to a blender. Add juice from ½ lime and ¼ teaspoon salt. Blend until carrot purée is very smooth (add more water if needed for desired consistency). Keep warm.

Bring approximately 3 quarts of water to a boil with 3 tablespoons salt added. Add snow peas and blanch 1 minute (2 minutes for green beans) and then remove with a slotted spoon. In the same water, cook couscous for about 6 to 8 minutes until al dente, strain. Coat couscous with 1 tablespoon olive oil and set aside.

Combine cooked corn, snow peas, diced heirloom tomatoes, juice from the other 1⁄2 lime plus the chopped cilantro in a bowl, along with the couscous. Add salt to taste. Place pork back on grill for 3 to 4 minutes to warm slightly (if desired) and then slice into large 4 pieces. Spoon carrot purée on each of 4 plates, then divide couscous salad equally. Place pork on each plate and serve immediately.

Cheers & Enjoy!

Peyrassol Rosés: That’s A Great Price, But What Do They Taste Like?

pey_groupIn a word, amazing.

First, some context: Even if you’re not a history buff, the story of the Peyrassol domain is pretty astounding. The estate was founded in the 13th century by the Knights of the Templar on the site of their Commanderie. (Yes, those same Knights who were dedicated to protecting the crusaders en route to the Holy Land.) Winemaking has continued on that very same land, uninterrupted over the centuries, under the command of various powers and families, to this day. And with that amount of practice and experience under its belt, it’s no wonder that Peyrassol produces wines that are considered the benchmark against which all other Provencal rosés are measured.

Today, Peyrassol adheres to strict organic guidelines in the vineyard, eschewing synthetic fertilizers, pesticides and fungicides for natural methods. The wines are a beautiful expression of the region’s clay and limestone terroir, capturing the very essence of Provence: fresh, refined elegance.

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The creme de la creme of the Peyrassol rosé collection is the Chateau de Peyrassol. Made with grapes harvested from the domain’s oldest vines, the wine gets its darker color, character and concentration from a long maceration period. It is a more full-bodied rosé, with notes of citrus, peach and apricot. It’s lively yet delicate, and is a very special bottle.

peyc_command

By comparison, the Commanderie de Peyrassol is a bit more traditional: it’s lighter in body with more minerality. It starts with lovely fruit blossom aromas, has refreshing flavors of watermelon and peach and finishes on a silky, stony note. The domain considers it the workhorse of the estate.

pey_lou

The newest addition to the Peyrassol lineup is entry-level-priced #Lou. It’s a highly-drinkable rosé for those both just getting into pink wine, as well as those of us who drink it year-round. It has a crisp start, fills your mouth with wild strawberries and citrus flavors, then finishes with mineral notes.

All three wines are on sale at Bottles through June 15th, 2017, at pricing meant to encourage your exploration of this historical and excellent estate. We think you’ll enjoy them as much as we do.

— #Lou: $11.99 (or just $10 a bottle with a 12-btl case purchase)
— Commanderie de Peyrassol: $19.99 (or just $16.66 a bottle with a 12-btl case purchase)
— Chateau de Peyrassol: $24.99 (or just $20.83 a bottle with a 12-btl case purchase)
(additional case discounts and rewards points do not apply)

All prices subject to change.

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The Top 5 New-In-Store Rosés

Last week we gave you a list of our no-fail rosés, those that have proven to be, vintage after vintage, reliably delicious.

Today we introduce you to a few of the newest additions to our rosé stable, those that Nick and Kate tasted for the first time just a month or so ago. They were the favorites among the many bottles that we opened a few weeks back at our annual all-staff rosé tasting, and we think you’ll love them.

mermRabble Rosé, Paso Robles, CA
A big, round, fruit-driven joy of a wine. It’s not sweet, but it’s ripe, and it’s made by Rabble, formerly known as Force of Nature, also known as one of our store’s most popular vintners. $14.99

assobioEsporao “Assobio,” Douro, Portugal
Refreshing with a delicate juiciness. It’s a crowd pleasing glass of red berries and minerals and a sister wine to the Assobio red, another of our store’s year-after-year most popular bottles.
$11.99

louPeyrassol “#Lou” Provence, France
From the classic Chateau Peyrassol comes this approachable, and lower-priced, bottle. It’s crisp with delicate notes of citrus, tart red fruits, and some peach. It will pair perfectly with summer Saturday afternoons. $14.99

bourgogneDomaine Gueguen, Burgundy, France
A rosé made just a few steps away from one of our favorite wine regions, Chablis. It’s dry with hints of thyme and rhubarb, peach and apricot. It’s 100% pinot noir and a steal at this price.
$18.99

tibourenClos Cibonne Tibouren, Provence, France
Elegant & bone dry, light but luxurious, lingering licks of bright fresh strawberry. This one will likely go down in the record books as our all-time favorite. It’s. That. Good. $27.99

All prices subject to change.

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Bottles’ Classics: Our Go-To Rosés

You know, we’ve been in this business for a long time now and we’ve seen a thing or two. And yet we’re still amazed by the phenomenon that rosé is. And with good reason: there are hundreds of bottles that are finely-crafted, extraordinarily food friendly and absolute true pleasures to drink. Yet there’s also a sea of rosés that miss the mark. We’ve found far too many that just wouldn’t deliver for your hard-earned dollars.

To help guide you to those that are reliably delicious year after year, we’ve selected those that we can confidently say are true classics: they’re well-made, trustworthy bottles (and a can!) that over-deliver superior enjoyment vintage after vintage. And here they are:

vinoCharles Smith “Vino,” Washington State
Deliciously tinged with tangerines and rose petals. “One sip and you can feel the summer sun on your face.” $13.99

 

bridgeBridge Lane, North Fork, New York
Guava, peach blossom, watermelon & strawberry. A North Fork of Long Island stunner.
$15.99

 

montaudChateau Montaud, Provence, France
So very light. So very strawberry. So very awesome. $12.99

 

under
Underwood, Oregon
It’s the clown-car of rosés: so much fun in one little vessel. It’s fruity, refreshing and dare we say a touch sweet. $7.99

 

goblesGobelsburg, Austria
Spritzy, pure, delicate and oh-so food friendly. In fact we’re not sure there’s a dish that wouldn’t pair well with this Austrian rosé.  $17.99

 

peyrassolChateau Peyrassol, Provence, France
The king of the classics. Round with flavors of peach and pear skin. It’s pure elegance in a bottle. $29.99

Stay tuned next week for more of our favorites, all new to Bottles this year.

All prices subject to change.

The Top 8 Late-Summer Rosés

Man is it hot.

The dog days are here – there’s no mistaking it.

But rather than bemoan the sweltering heat, let’s embrace it. Why not revel in the sultry steam, particularly when there’s still so much great rosé – the ultimate, refreshing summer sipper – to be had.

Grab a glass (any size or shape will do), an icy cold rosé (we have over 40 chilled), an ice-cube if you’d like (all the cool kids are doing it), and let the waves of heat wash over you. Soon it will be snowy February here in New England, and you’ll wish you did.

Here are the top 8 rosés to get you through the remaining days and nights of  the summer of 2016.

rose_end2
Chateau La Gordonne, ‘Verite du Terroir’ – Provence, France
This wine has a series of complex aromas, but primarily strawberry and blackcurrant. It’s a classic light Provencal rosé. $19.99

Meinklang, ‘Frizzante’ – Burgenland, Austria  
This is a long lived staff favorite, and for good reason!  It’s bright, refreshing, semi-sparkling, and organic.  Mix up your evenings and dinners by starting with a fun light bit of bubbles in place of prosécco or a cocktail.  $21.99

rose_end3
Domaine Tempier – Bandol, France
So … sticker-shock aside: this is a world-class, amazing wine… that just happens to be rosé! Bandol is a small fishing village within Provence that has a small but powerful wine region around it. Made from a minimum of 50% mourvedre, these wines are capable of aging for years.  We love Bandol in general, but Domaine Tempier is an archetype. Their wines are made from vines that are more than 20 years old, with lower yields. This rosé has notes of peach and pomegranate, and will not disappoint.  A great use of your Bottles’ Rewards Points! $47.99

Domaine La Fage, ‘Miraflors’ – Languedoc, France
Another super dependable entry from the south of France, the Miraflors is a blend of grenache and mourvedre, and has notes of raspberries and rose petals. $16.99

Calcu Vineyards, ‘Reserva Especial Rosé’ – Colchagua Valley, Chile
This Chilean blend is made up of malbec, syrah, and petite verdot.  It has a nice fresh acidity that is slightly tart and works well with many foods. $13.99

rose_end1

Chateau de Segries, Tavel – Provence, France
What a great example of a classic Provencal rosé. Tavel is a smaller region within Provence that produces deeply colored, beautiful full wines that are able to age for several years. $20.99

Serafini & Vidotto, “Bollicine” – Veneto, Italy
And now for something completely different. The Serafini rosé is a fully sparkling Italian wine that offers a great prosécco alternative without a massive price jump. It’s made from chardonnay and pinot nero and is incredibly refreshing. $17.99

Chateau Lancyre – Provence, France
This wine is a blend of syrah, grenache, and cinsault that has a wonderful fruity nose followed up by good, strong minerality from its limestone vineyard.  $19.99

Remember, rosés are finite. Once they’re gone for the season, they’re gone. Shop early and shop often!

Keep cool, Rhode Island.

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Summer Pairings: A Cool Dish for a Hot Week

vietnamese_salad_edible_rhody

 

It’s hot.

The air is hot. Our political climate is hot. Our society is hot. And we’re not even halfway through the Summer of 2016.

Things could change if we all cool down our own little corners of the world, one step at a time. And a good place to start is at the table, with family and friends.

Begin with a delicious, refreshing and easy to prepare chilled dish from Jason Timothy, chef/owner of Providence’s Laughing Gorilla Catering, that’s sure to please the crowd of 2 or 10 gathered at your table. Add open bottles of icy beer and wine (our picks below), good conversation, laughter and love, and watch the mercury drop.

edible_rhody_noodle_pair
We can’t get enough of the Gobelsburg Cistercien Rosé from Austria. Its bright balance of fresh acidity and excellent, round strawberry and peach fruit flavors make this a great match. The sauce’s citrus and jalapeno tang will be cooled by the fruit, while the minerality and acid provide enough structure to round out the whole dish.

We chose Revival Brewing Co.’s Fanny IPA as this noodle dish’s ideal beer partner. Its fruity hops from the Southern Hemisphere will highlight the melon’s cool notes, which piney North American hops accentuate the dish’s spicy flavors. And what’s even better, Fanny is low in alcohol, so it says as light in your  as does the salad, keeping everything in harmony.

And for the recipe, published in the beautiful Summer 2016 issue of Edible Rhody:

CHILLED VIETNAMESE RICE NOODLE SALAD
A note from chef Jason Timothy:  This is an easy, flavorful salad that is incredibly versatile. It’s been a favorite among my friends at summer cookouts when the weather is hot, the grill is going and the produce is abundant. I love to grab herbs and vegetables from the Armory Farmers’ Market that’s almost outside my door.

INGREDIENTS
1 package rice noodles (size noodle to your liking)
2 tablespoons neutral oil (such as grapeseed or canola)
¼ cup fish sauce
¼ cup water
¼ cup sugar
¼ cup fresh-squeezed lime juice, plus extra wedges for garnish
1 cucumber, seeded and sliced
2 cups sliced melon (watermelon or cantaloupe), rind removed
1 pound (3–4 cups) fresh bean sprouts
½ cup fresh Thai basil leaves, torn
½ cup fresh mint leaves, torn
½ cup fresh cilantro leaves
3 jalapeños, sliced (optional)
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground pepper

In a large pot, bring 8 cups of water to a boil. Add noodles and cook for 4–5 minutes. Strain noodles. Give them a quick rinse with cold water just to get the cooling started and, once well drained, toss lightly with oil. Let rest in the refrigerator, covered.

Meanwhile, combine fish sauce, water and sugar in a 1-quart saucepan. Cook until sugar is completely dissolved, 3–4 minutes. Add lime juice and set aside to cool.

When ready, add noodles to a large mixing (or serving) bowl. Add sliced cucumber and melon slices, bean sprouts, basil, mint, cilantro and sliced jalapeños. Toss with sauce. Add salt and pepper to taste. Garnish with lime wedges. Serve immediately or cover and chill until serving.

Serves 4–6.

Stay cool, eat well, and carry on.

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This Season’s Rosés, Part Three

Ah – here we are at last at the end of our rosé spectrumwith the wines that are darker, have a more intense fruit flavor, and finish on a savory note.

Though there’s lots of variation within this subsection, these wines are all bone dry. They drink more like a red wine than their lighter counterparts and match well with the widest array of food – especially rustic summertime grilled fare.

This style is for you if:

-strawberry rhubarb pie is your jam, and you’d bathe in BBQ sauce if given the chance.
-you think white wine is for wimps and on wine lists you look for big-fruit/high-acid reds such as malbec, cabernet sauvignon and chianti.

Buyer Beware! Due to the significant supply and demand issues, availability of each bottle changes daily. If you find one you like, buy multiple bottles because it may not be in store on your next visit. And if it isn’t, don’t fret! Bottles will be your rosé HQ this summer so visit often for a rotating selection of delicious fine rosé wines.

Here are our favorite medium to full, rich & savory styles from the 2015 vintage:

rose_pt2_group

Honoro Vera, Spain
A powerhouse of a rosé. Said one of our regulars: “It’s like a space party in my mouth!” Its refreshing flavors of strawberries & cherries are offset by an earthy dried-herb finish.

Taron Rosado, Spain
Debate reigns at Bottles on this one. Some find it subtle with light floral aromas. Others find it crisp with ripe strawberry flavors offset by subtle earthy notes. All find it eminently drinkable (especially given its low price).

Paul D., Austria
Clean and bright with flavors of honey, strawberry, dried apricot. Fresh, fruity, soft and smooth.

Domaine Vetriccie, Corsica
Big, bold fruitiness with notes of orange peel. Rustic Mediterranean summer wine at its best.

Chateau Trinquevedel, Tavel
A staff favorite, this Kermit Lynch import (ya’ll know how much we love his wines) is dry, tart, spicy and herbal. It’s the rosé for serious red wine drinkers.

Mulderbosch, South Africa
Tons of zippy flavor, this gem is balanced with fresh acidity and flavors of strawberries, cherries, and peach.

Las Perdices, Argentina
Big bodied, bold ripe cherry with a rich round finish. Toss a rib-eye on the grill and have at it.

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This Season’s Rosé, Part Two

It’s finally arrived!

East Coasters are finally enjoying the warmer, delightful weather that most people call Rosé Season. We at Bottles drink the pink year-round but it is an undeniable fact that longer sunny days and spring blossoms go hand-in-hand with bottles of chilled, crisp rosé.

This week, we explore the middle of the rosé spectrum. They’re the wines that, while still dry, are a bit more fruity, aromatic and floral. This style is for you if:

-you start your day with a bowl full of juicy fruit salad, and eat your weight in watermelon each summer.

– your fridge is usually stocked with new-world sauvignon blancs and other aromatic whites, or your go-to reds are medium bodied blends like Chianti and Cotes du Rhone.

These wines sing when paired with rustic, grilled foods such as mediterranean lamb, grilled fish and pork, and herbal sauces (think pesto).

Buyer Beware! Due to the significant supply and demand issues, availability of each bottle changes daily. If you find one you like, buy multiple bottles because it may not be in store on your next visit. And if it isn’t, don’t fret! Bottles will be your rosé HQ this summer so visit often for a rotating selection of delicious fine rosé wines.

Here are our favorite light-medium & floral rosés style from the 2015 vintage:

thumbnail_rose_light2

Gobelsburg, Austria
A staff favorite, the Gobelsburg is elegant and crisp with flavors of wild cherries and fresh berries.

Bridge Lane, Long Island
Made in Long Island, this rosé is perfect for the beach. It’s full of ripe red berries, guava & peach and has a lovely, lively, dry finish.

Zestos Rosado, Spain
Eminently drinkable, this Spanish beauty is brisk and refreshing with flavors of strawberry and watermelon.

Banshee, CA
One of our best-sellers, the Banshee screams with vibrant Mandarin orange and peach skin flavor and is accented with ripe  n’ tangy strawberry notes.

 

Drink Pink!

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